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May
29
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1:00 pm One thing leads to another… @ OGS Conference 2015
One thing leads to another… @ OGS Conference 2015
May 29 @ 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm
One thing leads to another… @ OGS Conference 2015 | Barrie | Ontario | Canada
A WORKSHOP FOR OGS CONFERENCE 2015 (SOLD OUT, SORRY) One Thing Leads to Another: Research techniques to help you follow the right ancestral trail Family history research is all about detective work – imaging what[...]
May
30
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1:45 pm Don’t you love a big index? @ OGS Conference 2015
Don’t you love a big index? @ OGS Conference 2015
May 30 @ 1:45 pm – 2:45 pm
Don't you love a big index? @ OGS Conference 2015 | Barrie | Ontario | Canada
A LECTURE AT OGS CONFERENCE 2015: Don’t you love a big index? The top 25 big indexes to consider for every Ontario ancestor Tried and true genealogy research techniques tell us to start with what[...]

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Hot off the press: Inheritance in Ontario

Very pleased to find a box from Dundurn Press at my door last week—the first copies of my new book Inheritance in Ontario: Wills and Other Records for Family Historians.

The book covers wills and related records from 1763 (well before “Ontario” existed) up to current records. For novices and researchers new to Ontario records, I’ve explained the structure and value of estate records. Experienced researchers will appreciate the descriptions of records beyond the estate files we typically use. The book covers records at the Archives of Ontario as well as those available on interloan and through FamilySearch.org around the world.

Cover of Inheritance in Ontario by Jane E MacNamaraResearchers with roots before 1793 will be particularly interested in Chapter 2: Early Records of Inheritance, where I’ve extracted the names of all parties involved in hearings before the District Prerogative courts. Not just the deceased, but administrators, heirs, guardians, friends, relatives, and creditors—a rich resource for the period.

Thank you to the archivists and librarians in Toronto, Ottawa, London, Prince Edward County, Detroit, and Salt Lake City, as well as friends and fellow researchers in most of those places—for your help and insight and support. (Now I’ll have to find something else to pester you about!)

For more details, please visit the Inheritance in Ontario page.

3 comments to Hot off the press: Inheritance in Ontario

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